Tag Archives: PM

“The real Chancellor” carves up George Osborne

As Chancellor,  George Osborne spent the least time of anyone in the Treasury sorting out the economy.   Ever the delegator, he left that minor job to someone else.  He was tied up with the important stuff,  permanent manoeuvres to ensure that he succeeded David Cameron as PM.  Smoozing,  threatening, devoting hours every week to cultivating Tory back-benchers and ingratiating himself with allies in the Press, this was the work that really mattered. 

Rupert Harrison, Osbo’s Chief of Staff, was “the real Chancellor”.  When Harrison left, the economy went A over T.  Now Harrison turns on his old boss to slaughter George for an attitude to Brexit that is “too gloomy and over the top”. Continue reading

Thuglike bullies on twitter give away Corbyn’s game

Robert Peston should be ashamed at the way he brushed aside the abusive behaviour of Corbynistas.  Apparently a Tory MP has been suspended for using the phrase “n…… in a woodpile”.   Daily Corbynista abuse is a million times worse than this.

Although I am a Tory, many of Mrs. May’s policies and decisions are not policies and decisions I agree with.  But the abuse she gets is over the top.  So indignant have I been at the cussing and blinding she receives, several times, I have told the tweeters responsible that they are out of line.  Continue reading

The Decepticons are trying to bring down our PM, Boris and Brexit

Journalist Peter Oborne has written repeatedly that the then PM Cameron and Osbo had done a deal with the Blairites.  He later wrote that Cam was planning to kick out the right wing Brexiteers in the party, in favour of Tristram Hunt and Rachel Reeves, forming a “new” Remainer Tory party.

That plan was foiled by the guts of one man – Boris Johnson, backed by a rock solid phalanx of Brexiteers.   All the advantages were on the side of Remain.  The money, the media, the manpower were Remain’s – but every Brexiteer was so fired up, they were prepared to prevail or die.  Continue reading

Brilliant Boris Johnson ridicules the “yammering cacophany” of the BBC stitchup last night

OMIGOD.  I am not a May fun, but the PM could not have made a better decision than to shun the bitter leftie losers who seized the opportunity to spew venom in last night’s BBC debate. Continue reading

“Intellectually brilliant” Boris Johnson joins new “supertight” Brexit team

When Boris Johnson first became Foreign Secretary, the media jumped on him, trying to make the most of anything they saw as a “gaffe”.  That has now ended. Boris is a workaholic and a lightning quick study. He has been described as the most learned, gifted Foreign Secretary since Lord Curzon by journalist Peter Oborne. Continue reading

Body blow for Hammond as PM picks Bojo strategy for EU

For six months the battle has raged between the Boris Johnson strategy in dealing with the EU and Philip Hammond’s softer Remainian approach.  Boris’s brilliant plan has covered every ambiguity and has a fall back position, should things not go as planned.  So well calculated  is the strategy though, that it is impossible to find a flaw.boriseusummit2Superbrain Boris has covered all eventualities and Brexiteers were ecstatic at the positive and gracious tone of the speech, that cloaked an iron structure.  The Sun reported:  “His allies hailed key decisions to leave the single market, pull out of two thirds of the customs union and end “vast” EU budget payments as the arguments Boris has been making since the EU referendum campaign. Continue reading

The majority are not happy with how the PM is handling Brexit

The latest YouGov poll has disappointing news for Mrs. May.  Nearly 60% are unhappy with how she is handling Brexit.  The discontent is rising rising.  53% has risen to 57%. Only 20% believe Brexit is being handled well.maysmirkThe Sun reports:The numbers expecting the UK to be worse-off financially as a result of Brexit declined from 41% to 37% over the past month, against 29% who expect it to be better-off. And the proportion who said Brexit would be bad for jobs fell from 36% to 32%, compared to 28% who said it would be good for employment. Continue reading